Gastric Sleeve Surgery

Explore The Bariatric Skinny to learn about gastric sleeve surgery. Find the information you’re looking for about your vertical sleeve gastrectomy.

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Gastric Sleeve Surgery Overview

Gastric sleeve surgery, or vertical sleeve gastrectomy, is a relatively newer type of bariatric surgery. In this procedure, instead of creating a pouch, a surgeon removes more than half of the stomach leaving a new banana-shaped tube. Surgical staples are used to reseal the remaining stomach. The level of Ghrelin, a hormone that controls hunger and appetite sensations, normally created and secreted from the portion of the removed stomach, is reduced to nearly zero. The removed portion of the stomach is also the most stretchable. Therefore, the new long, tubular shape is less likely to expand, permanently restricting the volume of food it is able to hold. Post surgery, only small amounts of food are needed to reach fullness. This irreversible procedure requires that patients make a lifelong commitment to eat only smaller portions of healthy, vitamin-rich foods.

Good gastric sleeve candidates generally have a BMI greater than 40 which roughly equates to 100 pounds overweight for men and 80 pounds overweight for women. Gastric sleeve surgery, less common than gastric bypass surgery, is considered a reasonable alternative because, without the intestinal bypass, there is minimal risk of malabsorptive complications. The pylorus is preserved minimizing the risk of dumping syndrome. By avoiding intestinal bypass, the chance of intestinal obstruction, ulcers, and vitamin deficiencies are eliminated or greatly reduced. As a first-stage procedure for patients with an extremely high BMI, gastric sleeve surgery results have proven to be very effective. The surgery appeals to patients with concerns about complications related to bypass procedures or having a foreign object (like a lap-band) in their bodies. It is also recommended for patients with existing conditions like anemia, Crohn’s disease, or irritable bowel syndrome.

Post gastric sleeve surgery, patients should expect to stay in the hospital for one or two full days. Full recovery may take several weeks. Patients will need to accustom their new stomachs to eating solid foods. In the first two weeks, patients should limit their diet to liquid-only followed by about six more weeks of pureed foods before returning to solids. As with other weight loss surgeries, long-term weight loss success must include regular exercise and lifelong diet modifications. Patients learn to eat more slowly, consume much smaller quantities of food, chew thoroughly, and not eat and drink at the same time. Risks and complications from vertical sleeve gastrectomy may include leaking of the gastric sleeve if staples do not hold before full recovery, blood clots, and possible weight regain over time.

More on Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric Surgery Puts Diabetes On The Run

Woman's Diabetes Disappears After Surgery

New research from a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that weight loss surgery can reverse and possibly cure diabetes.  Changes to the stomach and intestine lead to changes of the endocrine system that can regulate metabolic pathways and lead to diabetic improvements, as it did for the bariatric surgery patient featured in this clip. In this video, Dr. Francesco Rubino of the New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center discusses this new study and how it may affect how weight loss surgery is viewed going forward.  

From the Bariatric Surgery Journals

  • Sick of it posted by jlbundy
    I am so sick of trying to keep track of calories, protein, fat and fiber! I just want to eat healthy and not think about it. I had gastric bypass done 10/8/2008. I almost got down to my goal weight. I was playing with 5lbs for the last 4 years, but now I am gaining. I know it is my fault. I don't use my tool. I drink with meals and I eat too many starchy carbs and not enough protein....

From the Message Boards

  • Bariatric surgery is a life changing event. Your body, your eating habits, your calorie and nutrition levels and more will be going through significant changes. Getting emotional support with your surgery and post-procedure living can make a big difference in properly adjusting to the "New You" and making your weight loss permanent.

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